Feedback would happen all the time if…

This blog began as my contribution to the #FeedbackCarnival (you can read more about the concept here) because I wanted to contribute to the topic and discussion and benefit from reading the thoughts and opinions of others, hopefully with a view to improving and developing myself in this key, but often overlooked or misused function of the workplace. However, through the course of the writing and research it’s become a self-directed learning exercise.

However on jotting down my ideas the list quickly grew and encompassed more than just work-life examples. In fact some of the best examples of feedback being delivered and received frequently come from my home-life. My list is as follows:

Feedback would happen all the time if:

  • It was delivered and received with the best of intentions, whether good or bad feedback
  • The environment provided an open, honest and trusting space for the feedback to be given and received
  • There was a feedback loop; both giver and receiver could respond to the feedback, act on the feedback and continue the conversation on
  • Actions post feedback were considered and assessed
  • Make sure the feedback is genuine and helpful in some way (even if it’s something to work on)

Like I say above, when I started to think about the feedback I have received two people come to mind as delivering it very well. First up my daughter, Miss 5, who regularly comments, praises and in some cases admonishes me, but always with the best of intentions; a prime example being you look gorgeous in those shoes Mama, but I’m not loving that dress on you. My current manager too is very good at giving feedback, both positive and negative. She has a way and an approach that ensures I know it is delivered with my best interests at heart. She gives me feedback so I am able to grow and develop, I hugely appreciate it and as a result work hard to keep in mind that which she imparts.

Social Media gives the perfect receptacle for feedback in the modern world. Whilst there are the obvious examples and means for people to give terrible feedback, the flip side of this is environments are also being created for exceptionally insightful feedback, both positive and negative, but all enabling us an opportunity for development through blogging, chats, commenting, sharing and the like.

This all got me thinking about how I am with feedback so I asked around and got some fantastic responses – again positive and negative. I asked people who I hoped would be honest with me and again, inform me in the spirit I was asking in.

Again, this has given me some great development ideas and added to my list:

  • Change your feedback style according to better match the person you are delivering to
  • To be appreciated more feedback should be given regularly, often and updated where appropriate
  • Don’t be too quick to dismiss feedback, take time to mull it over

We’re about to start the next round of Performance Reviews in our workplace, and this is always a time where I coach and remind managers of the importance of feedback; the quality of it and how it’s delivered. So not only am I self-reflecting, learning and developing as a result of this blog, I’m looking for ways to inspire those around me to put more into their feedback also.

I look forward to workplaces where feedback happens all the time as a matter of course in the working day. I hope we are all working towards a situation where feedback was constant and plentiful, for we would all be better for it. I await the rest of the blogs in the #FeedbackCarnival and anticipate having more to work on very soon!

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